Upcoming Events 2014

It’s been a while since I updated you on my travel plans, so now I’ve had some more conferences confirmed, I thought I would pass the information on.

I’ve been really lucky to have been selected for some great conferences this year. I was asked to do a few more, and it was genuinely painful to say no to everything, but it seems the laws of space and time cannot be broken, and so I’ve been forced to select a tiny subset of all the places I’d like to go:

  • 20 May: [GOTO Chicago](http://gotocon.com/chicago-2014/presentation/HTML5,%20Angular.js,%20Groovy,%20Java, %20MongoDB%20all%20together%20-%20what%20could%20possibly%20go%20wrong?) - I’m giving the same live coding presentation from QCon London, although knowing me I expect there will be some tweaks, changes, additions, and maybe improvements.
  • 22-23 May: In New York City, since I’m more or less in the area. Gimme a shout if you want to meet for a drink.
  • 25-28 May: SpeakerConf Barcelona. And while I’m in the area…
  • 29 May: Barcelona JUG - “HTML5, Angular.js, Groovy, Java, MongoDB all together - what could possibly go wrong?”
  • 2-5 June: New York City, probably (wait, am I going to be at home at all??)
  • 23 July: OSCON - live coding again!
  • 28 Sep - 2 Oct: JavaOne woohoo! I love having this opportunity to visit San Francisco.

I’ve got a couple of other events I’m still trying to work out the details for, but I think this is 2014 all booked up.

Sevilla MUG March Madness

Last night the Sevilla MUG had our March Madness event. This was our largest event yet, with 36 people signed up. Although the aim of March Madness is to have a MongoDB Engineer at all the user groups this month, that’s not such a big deal for us as I live here, so this was also the first event where I wasn’t the main attraction - [Javier] (https://twitter.com/JvrBaena) gave a really great talk about the lessons learnt at SocialBro after using MongoDB in production for the last couple of years.

The slides for my introduction to Replica Sets and Sharding:

And the slides for the main attraction:

The event went really well, everyone seemed engaged, and our first talk in Spanish seemed to encourage more questions than normal. We were also in a new venue, and although I love the central location of our previous venue and the friendliness of the owners, the menu of the new location seemed to be a massive win.

First presentation at the Virtual JUG!

Yesterday I had the privilege of presenting the very first session for vJUG, a new virtual Java User Group that allows us to span geographies when sharing talks and stories. I’m really interested in the vJUG idea, especially now I’m not in London - if we can find good ways to share knowledge without having to travel, that will help us reach people who don’t normally go to conferences or don’t have a local user group to go to. Not to mention cutting travel costs and saving the environment.

See the event, and the record of the IRC chat, here:

The slides are also online, but obviously they’re part of the video as well:

Trisha's World Tour 2013

Quick update on my scheduled events this year.  Please feel free to suggest your MUG or JUG or other tech group as somewhere for me to visit on this Grand World Tour if I’m in your city.

17-21st June - In New York - woohoo!  Getting to know Justin Lee, the newest member of the Java team, doing some pair programming (hopefully) and meeting people at the MongoDB Masters’ Summit on Thursday.
24th June - STAC Summit, London - I’m not presenting, but I’ll be there “networking” (a.k.a. drinking)
27th June - Technology Transformation Network, London.  Tiny bit concerned about this event now (don’t tell anyone) because I’m hoping to run break out sessions on how to approach design, and I’m not sure I can do this alone….
1-5th July - In Dublin, hoping to talk to a MUG or JUG while I’m there.  Invite me!
22-25th July - JavaOne Shanghai (CON1148). I’ve never been east of Europe before, very exciting.
August - Going to be in Seville (Spain), and a weekend in Madrid.
11-12th Sept - JavaZone, Oslo, hopefully.
16-20th Sept - Hopefully working from the Palo Alto office, so if there’re are any events in Silicon Valley or San Francisco that week, I’d love to hear about them.

22-26 Sept - JavaOne, San Francisco.
30th Sept - 2nd Oct - GOTO Aarhus
17-18th Oct - GOTO Berlin.
28-30th Oct - JAX London.
December - YOW Melbourne, Brisbane, Sydney - Australia. I’ve never been to Oz, I can’t wait!

And that’s that.  The only two other events I’m contemplating this year are Devoxx and the London Java Community Open Conference.  I think I’m maxed out.

2013 is looking a lot busier than I planned…

So, despite promising myself that I would only do one event a month for the rest of this year, looks like I’m going to be a bit busier than that.

In case you’re wondering what I’m up to (or, even better, hoping to see me talk or meet me), here are my confirmed engagements:

15-17 May - GeeCon, Poland
18-20 June - GOTO Amsterdam - whole day tutorial on the new (unfinished) MongoDB Java driver.
24th June - STAC Summit, London - something MongoDB-shaped (i.e. not Java-specific)
27th June - Technology Transformation Network, London
1-5th July - In Dublin, hoping to talk to a MUG or JUG while I’m there.
22-25th July - JavaOne Shanghai (CON1148). So excited to go to China!
August - Looks like I’m going to be in Spain a couple of times (Madrid/Seville).
11-12th Sept - Love to go to JavaZone, Oslo.  We’ll see.
22-26 Sept - JavaOne, San Francisco.
30th Sept - 2nd Oct - GOTO Aarhus - very pleased I can make it this year!
17-18th Oct - GOTO Berlin.
28-30th Oct - JAX London.
December - YOW Melbourne, Brisbane, Sydney - Australia.  I’ve never been to Oz, I can’t wait!

If you’ve either clicked through those, or you’ve already been stalking my talks, you’ll see I haven’t actually made up my mind what to call this year’s main presentation:
  1. What do you mean, Backwards Compatibility?
  2. Design is a process, not an artefact
  3. Design is a process, not a document
This is mostly because when I signed up for some of these conferences, I thought I was going to be talking about how hard it was to write backwardly-compatible libraries (which it is).  But when I wrote the presentation, it turned out to be about software design.  And then I found out artefact/artifact can be spelt two ways, ho hum.
I’m still not sure yet if this will actually be the same (but evolving) talk under two different guises, or if they are two subtly different talks.  I guess we’ll see what I end up writing the week before I’m due to present “Design is a process, not a document”.

Mike and I debut our new Disruptor presentation

Last Tuesday Mike and I unveiled our brand shiny new presentation: Understanding the Disruptor, a Beginner’s Guide to Hardcore Concurrency.  This was a preview of the talk we’ll be doing at JAX London on the 2nd November.

A video of the session is available, as are the slides.  I promise not to say “so” anywhere near as many times when I repeat my performance at JAX (is there anything more painful than watching yourself on video?).

I thought the session went really really well.  We got some great questions at the end, we had an audience that was engaged, and I was dead pleased we didn’t lose anyone with the assembly language.  We had some very valuable feedback afterwards too.

As well as our presentation, there were three great lightning talks:

    Somay Nakhal on Java Thread States - Somay gave a nice overview of thread lifecycles with code and some great diagrams.  I liked how he made this more applicable to the real world than the sort of book examples you get.

    Ged Byrne on the shiny new LJC Book Club - Ged reminded us how great it is to read an actual, paper book.  How committing to reading page by page forces you to learn in a different way to jumping around internet references that might not give you the context you need.  I thought this was a great presentation with humour, and I liked the way he challenged us to “expand our minds”.  Although the actual book he was reviewing was Oracle Coherence 3.5, I’ve decided I need to read Beautiful Software, which Ged quoted at the end of the talk.

    Peter Lawrey on Common Java Misconceptions - A session which plays well with what we’re trying to preach when we talk about Tackling Folklore.  He covered a few topics that are assumed to be “truth”.  For example, dealing with garbage collection is not a mandatory part of writing Java - you could write GC-friendly code for a start.  Also it’s naive to assume the JDK is written in an efficient way, anyone who’s actually dug around it for a while will realise that newer, more efficient methods of programming have not been applied to all areas of the (massive) existing code base.  I think it’s great to have people out there talking about this stuff, it’s too easy to make assumptions and take things for granted.  The most important thing he said: “If you’re told something, don’t just believe it - test it yourself first”.

All of us (me, Mike and the lightning talk presenters) got such a great response it has encouraged us at the LJC to try and push for more real developers presenting their experiences.  We have a lot of great presentations from vendors, but what’s more applicable to Java guys and girls across the board is other developers sharing the problems they’re trying to solve and how they go about that process.

I’m very much looking forward to presenting this again at JAX.

My first public appearance

I’m finally moving up from working behind the scenes to actually doing a (short) presentation for the LJC. I’m going to be giving a lightning talk on Wednesday at the AWS Elastic Beanstalk event, on the JCP - what it is and what our election to the executive committee means.  Ben and Martin’s post gives a little more background on the subject.

Another LMAX LJC member Mike will also be giving a lightning talk, on Project Coin.

Now all I have to do is write it…